But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Library of Historical Apologetics - Apologetic Report

David McGrew’s latest at Project 360 reacquaints us with the work Miracles by historical apologist C.S. Lewis! Enjoy, and like Project 360 and the Library of Historical Apologetics on Facebook for more content loaded with timeless truth!

Breath of Life: The Argument from Consciousness and...

Read more

Tuesday, 04 July 2017 13:17

Watson, Richard

Written by

imageAn Apology for the Bible is Bishop Watson’s answer to Thomas Paine’s book The Age of Reason, Part II, which is a sort of catalogue of standard gripes about both the Old and the New Testaments. The book is surprisingly timely, as many of these objections are still circulating today...

Read more

imageThe Kindle edition of Hidden in Plain View: Undesigned Coincidences in the Gospels and Acts is available for pre-order on Amazon for only $4.99! This special price will continue until July 10, when the...

Read more

Friday, 23 June 2017 12:37

Announcing the Deeper Roots Conference

Written by

imageLooking for a way to:

  • deepen your faith?
  • strengthen your relationship with God?
  • gain confidence in sharing your faith with others?
  • pass on your faith to your children?
  • meet others interested in these same things?

Join the Library of Historical Apologetics in parnertship with Defenders Media this fall at...

Read more

Sunday, 18 June 2017 12:41

Blunt, John James

Written by

imageAn undesigned coincidence occurs when one account of an event leaves out a bit of information that doesn’t affect the overall picture, but a different account indirectly supplies the missing detail, usually answering some natural question raised by the first. Forgers do not want to leave...

Read more

Friday, 16 June 2017 10:45

Butler: All of the evidence taken together

Written by

image[T]he truth of our religion, like the truth of common matters, is to be judged of by all the evidence taken together. And unless the whole series of things which may be alleged in this argument, and every particular thing in it, can reasonably be supposed to have been by accident (for here the...

Read more

Wednesday, 14 June 2017 11:39

Chesterton on Miracles

Written by

imageSomehow or other an extraordinary idea has arisen that the disbelievers in miracles consider them coldly and fairly, while believers in miracles accept them only in connection with some dogma. The fact is quite the other way. The believers in miracles accept them (rightly or wrongly) because they...

Read more

Tuesday, 06 June 2017 13:35

Nathaniel Lardner on the Argument from Silence

Written by

imageTWO OBJECTIONS TAKEN FROM THE SILENCE OF JOSEPHUS.

I. He has not mentioned the slaughter of the infants of Bethlehem:

II. Nor of the Galileans, whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices.

ST. MATTHEW says, chap. ii. 16, “Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was...

Read more

imageIf it be allowed that there was such a person as Jesus Christ, that he was virtuous and amiable, that he preached the most excellent morality and practiced the virtues which he taught, from what source is the knowledge of this derived? How do we know that there was such a person, and that his...

Read more

Friday, 29 July 2016 21:08

The usual character of human testimony

Written by

I know not a more rash or unphilosophical conduct of the understanding, than to reject the substance of a story, by reason of some diversity in the circumstances with which it is related. The usual character of human testimony is substantial truth under circumstantial variety. This is what the daily experiences of courts of justice teaches. When

Thursday, 21 July 2016 21:29

The principle of credulity

Written by

The principle of credulity is as regular in its operation, as any other principle of the mind; and is so dependant on circumstances, and so restrained and checked by other parts of human nature, that sometimes the most obstinate incredulity is found in that very class of people, whose easy belief on other occasions moves our contempt. . . . [I]n

Sunday, 17 July 2016 22:32

No double standards

Written by

About the end of the second century, the Gospels were reverenced as sacred books by a community dispersed over the world, composed of men of different nations and languages. There were, to say the least, sixty thousand copies of them in existence; they were read in the churches of Christians; they were continually quoted, and appealed to, as of

Friday, 15 July 2016 17:30

A general indisposition towards believing

Written by

A motive, however stronger in itself than another, may yet make a weaker impression, when employed, after that the motive of less, tho’ sufficient, strength hath already been resisted. For the mind doth, by every degree of affected unbelief, contract more and more of a general indisposition towards believing: So that such a proof, as would

Tuesday, 26 April 2016 21:01

The apologetic religion

Written by

Christianity is an apologetic religion. Not only now, in the second period of the Reformation epoch, from the close of the seventeenth century to this day, apology has been, by force of circumstances, a prominent action of the religion toward the world. In the primitive Church history, too, there was a “period of apologetics,” which in

Saturday, 23 April 2016 21:01

The letters of Paul

Written by

We may, then, without prejudice, take the evidence of Paul of Tarsus on the historicity of Jesus, and examine it. If we are challenged as to the genuineness of Paul’s epistles, let us tell our questioner to read them. Novels have been written in the form of correspondence; but Paul’s letters do not tell us all that a novelist or a

Tuesday, 12 April 2016 21:19

Charles Leslie: How unreasonable to reject these facts

Written by

Besides that the importance of the subject would oblige all men to inquire more narrowly into the one than the other. For what consequence is it to me, or to the world, whether there was such a man as Caesar; whether he beat, or was beaten at Pharsalia; whether Homer or Virgil wrote such books; and whether what is related in the Iliads or Aeneids

Sunday, 27 March 2016 06:00

I know of no one fact

Written by

[T]he evidence of our Lord’s life, and death, and resurrection, is of the same sort as that which we rest on in human matters. Whoever has heard the summing up of a judge on any great trial, will be able to understand what I mean; the jury have heard a great many witnesses; some of them have perhaps contradicted others, some have stated