But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Founders - Apologetic Report
Monday, 20 June 2016 05:00

Must I Join a Church to be a Christian?

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Post by Jeff Robinson.

I have heard many versions of this notion over the years, phrased as both a statement and a declaration. “I don’t have to go to church to be a Christian—do I?”

More often than not, it’s been put this way: “I love Jesus and the Bible, but I don’t love the church.” Or those more...

Tuesday, 14 June 2016 03:12

Hymns and the Doctrine of Election Featured

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Post by Ken Puls.

In the last post we began looking at doctrine in hymns. Specifically, we focused on hymns that teach about the depravity of man. The music of the church is tied to theology. We sing as well as preach our doctrine. Our songs instruct us. They can teach us well or they can teach us poorly. They can be theologically barren, with...

Tuesday, 31 May 2016 06:00

Confessions of Faith: “No Creed But The Bible” Featured

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Post by Tom Nettles.

1. The Bible: A Matter of Faith

At the most basic level, every Christian should confess, “I have no creed but the Bible.” The Bible is meant to be believed. In matters of faith dependent upon revealed truth, therefore, the Christian should make no commitment of heart or head to a proposition not founded...

Thursday, 26 May 2016 05:00

Hermeneutics: New Testament Priority Featured

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Post by Tom Hicks.

One important aspect of biblical hermeneutics (the theory of biblical interpretation) is the principle of “New Testament priority.” At the beginning of the Middle Ages, Augustine of Hippo (354-430) expressed New Testament priority with the phrase, “The New is in the Old concealed; the Old is in the New...

Post by Jon English Lee.

Historical theology has been defined as “the study of the interpretation of Scripture and the formulation of doctrine by the church of the past.”[1] Simply put, historical theology is answering this question: How has the church thought about the Bible in the past? Some people hear the...

Friday, 20 May 2016 06:51

Eight Reasons to Study Baptist History Featured

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Post by Jeff Robinson.

I always begin church history classes the same way as our dear brother Tom Nettles, with a lecture called “Why Study Church History?” I’m not merely seeking to copycat my mentor; we live in an age in which what C.S. Lewis called “chronological snobbery”—the prioritizing of all things new...

Tuesday, 17 May 2016 03:13

Hymns and the Depravity of Man

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Post by Ken Puls.

Hymns are a treasure trove of doctrinal truth. Singing hymns is a wonderful way to teach doctrine and to augment the teaching and preaching ministry of the church. Those who lead the church in singing do well to explore and mine this trove for its rich gems.

Consider the doctrine of the depravity of man. If you were teaching a...

Post by Tom Nettles.

I think there has been a misunderstanding. Trevin Wax is concerned that I am writing off my non-Calvinist brethren as “on the same plane of theological degeneracy as man-centered liberals.” He then compares that to the non-Calvinist argument that all Calvinists have the seeds of hyper-Calvinism ready to blossom in...

Post by Guest Blogger.

[The following is a guest post by Jared Longshore. Jared is a pastor at Grace Baptist Church in Cape Coral, FL, a PhD candidate at SBTS, and blogger at http://jaredlongshore.com]

***I sent this to Trevin before posting, and he in turn has sent me a very thoughtful and brotherly response....

Thursday, 12 May 2016 04:52

Can You be a Christian without Going to Church? Featured

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Post by Phil Newton.

I’ve heard it many times. “Well, you don’t have to attend church to be a Christian.” “Attending church doesn’t make you a Christian!” “I don’t need the church; I worship God in my own way.”

In each case, someone attempts to provide a barrier to further conversation...

Post by Tom Ascol.

The late Martyn Lloyd-Jones was reported to have said that “the ignorant Arminian doesn’t know the difference between Calvinism and hyper-Calvinism.” Based on the frequency with which the two are often confused I would suggest that the ignorance is not limited to our Arminian friends. While much more could be...

Post by Fred Malone.

1. You never preach well enough to convert a single person. That is, unless you believe that faith is an ability of man generated to decision by the persuasive abilities of the preacher. But I don’t believe that saving faith is a natural ability of man. Faith is a sovereign grace-gift of God which comes to those who hear...

Post by Tom Nettles.

For some time now, my blog posts have pursued an inquiry of how non-Calvinists and Calvinists among Southern Baptists have come to be involved in a public conversation on their respective positions. I have tried to track the historical development of the non-Calvinist position. In this final submission on this series, I...

Post by Jon English Lee.

The Second London Baptist Confession contains several strong statements on the doctrine of scripture. This doctrine is the bedrock of any true christian faith and, thus, must be clearly defended in every generation.

While the framers of the Westminster and Second London confessions were keen to counter several particular...

Saturday, 23 April 2016 10:09

The Division of Old Testament Law

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Post by Tom Hicks.

Are believers in Christ required to obey any part of Old Testament law? Both Dispensationalists and proponents of New Covenant Theology, or Progressive Covenantalism, as one version of it has come to be called, simply say “no.” In their view, the laws of the Old Testament are fulfilled and abrogated in Christ....

Post by Jeff Robinson.

In my previous article, I argued that the regulative principle of worship is a Baptist doctrine. But any Baptist worth his or her salt will ask the more salient question: But is it a biblical doctrine?

I want to argue that it is in fact a biblical doctrine and give a brief biblical defense from 32,000 feet. As I sought to show...

Tuesday, 19 April 2016 03:11

Lord I Deserve Thy Deepest Wrath

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Post by Ken Puls.

Music is a marvelous means of expressing our hearts to God in worship. It unites individual voices into one voice. It unites meaningful words to memorable tunes. And it unites biblical doctrine to passionate expression. Music can carry joy and praise as well as grief and repentance. It can serve us and point our affections to...

Thursday, 14 April 2016 05:00

The Gospel Triumphs

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Post by Phil Newton.

But thanks be to God, who always leads us in triumph in Christ, and manifests through us the sweet aroma of the knowledge of Him in every place” (2 Corinthians 2:14).

The image sticking in the Corinthian’s mind over Paul’s use of this language would be similar to someone in the Deep South mentioning...

Post by Tom Ascol.

Everyone loves Charles Spurgeon. Even those who feel compelled to edit the Calvinism from his sermons and writings have shown great appreciation for him as a preacher of God’s Word. Little wonder, Spurgeon is a rare gift of God to the church. His life and labors stand like Mont Blanc over the post-Apostolic landscape...

Post by Fred Malone.

1. I am more sinful than I first thought I was. The constant opening of my heart to self-examination while researching sermons has revealed the twists and turns of sin in my own heart. The result has been a greater thankfulness for our Father’s plan of grace, our Lord Jesus’ suffering for my sins, and a...

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