But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Mere Orthodoxy - Apologetic Report
Tuesday, 15 August 2017 20:00

Social Conservatism vs Tribal Nationalism

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I’m pleased to publish this guest essay from Dr. Paul D. Miller.

What was social conservatism, and why did evangelicals adopt it as their political creed? What has become of the movement under President Donald J. Trump?

Politically, social conservatism came to mean, above all, opposition to...

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Wednesday, 09 August 2017 20:00

On John Locke and His Woke Catholic Critics

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The world is going to hell.

This unfortunate development most certainly began with the Enlightenment (or was it Duns Scotus?) and it isentirely the fault of John Locke and his nasty gang of philosophy boys.

Thus proceeds the standard dirge of the Woke Catholic.

The Woke Catholic is a strange bird,...

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James K.A. Smith’s recent criticism of those who have made a particular sexual ethic a criterion of ‘orthodoxy’ has generated a minor kerfuffle, as these things go. My friends and Mere Fidelity collaborators Derek Rishmawy and Alastair Roberts have both weighed in, Alan Jacobs has...

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I’m pleased to publish this guest review by the Rev. Kyle Dillon.

American churches today have become divided over the question of what it means to live as Christians in an increasingly post-Christian society. Should our approach toward secular culture be one of confrontation? Adaptation?...

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Thursday, 03 August 2017 20:00

Little Platoons and the Market

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In his response to Andrew Strain, Joe Carter noted that one of Strain’s problems is the assumption that “some other people—rather than those directly engaged in the market activity—should decide what is best for those involved.”

Well, yes—at least in a way.

This...

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Critic: The first time I saw The Bathroom Bolsheviks live was in 1877. It was unlike anything I or anyone else had ever seen.1

Audience Member: When Trotsky came out on stage, the crowd wentcrazy. And then when their first song ended, he took the payday loan industry and lit it on fire. I…...

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Tuesday, 01 August 2017 20:00

In Praise of Cultural Christianity

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I’m pleased to publish this guest editorial from Stephen Wolfe.

Cultural Christianity is frequently an object of scorn in American evangelical Christianity. Though elsewhere even atheists claim to be culturally Christian (e.g., Richard Dawkins), in the United States the term usually refers to...

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I’m pleased to publish this book review by my friend Kyle Williams.

Last yeareighty-one percent of evangelicals voted for Donald Trump—a wider margin than in any previous election. These voters played no small role in tipping the scales in a contest that was decided by thin margins. But...

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Wednesday, 26 July 2017 20:00

Young Christians and the Specter of Socialism

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Earlier this week Andrew Strain wrote a sharp, if also too short, post for First Things arguing that economic debates that orbit around whether or not the government should intervene in the marker are ultimately meaningless. This is the gist of his argument:

Neoliberals often invoke a dichotomy...

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Tuesday, 25 July 2017 20:00

Creating a Just and Good Healthcare System

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On June 3rd, 2017, I gave a talk to theMaryland chapterof theAmerican Solidarity Party.The original text of my talk is below the video.

If there’s one thing everyone can agree on in American politics in 2017, it’s that our healthcare system does not work as it should. We spend more...

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Our republic is currently embarked on an audacious experiment: We have, through a series of economic and cultural choices, destroyed many of the intermediate social structures that people rely on to shape their lives and give them a sense of purpose and significance....

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“Not again.”

That was my first thought when Eugene Peterson’s comments on gay marriage came out.

Regardless of the retraction, I knew the next few days would be ugly online. Various think-pieces (good and bad) would come, as would the tweets, the aggressive partisans, and the...

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The current story of Christian media is not—despite the pain occasioned by the passing ofBooks and Culture—exclusively one of decline and buzzfeedification. This summer marksthe advent of a new annual, edited by Michael Martin, titledJesus the Imagination.

Martin is a Byzantine Rite...

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Tuesday, 18 July 2017 20:00

17776 and the End of Nature

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If you read Hannah Anderson’s Humble Roots a few days before reading Jon Bois’s “17776” you’ll experience a kind of whiplash. Anderson’s book is about gratitude and exploring the ways that creation teaches us about God, about ourselves, and about virtue....

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  • Human beings are created in the image of God, body and soul, and have been called as such “very good.” Our bodily nature reflects God’s goodness to us and the embodied acts that we participate in (eating, sleeping, work, communicating, sexual relations, etc.) are expressions of...

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Sunday, 16 July 2017 20:00

Book Review: Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson

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A couple weeks ago I was reviewing a draft of Kayla Snow’s excellent review of The Long, Long Life of Trees and we began talking about the historically unprecedented ignorance of place that defines many in the west today. A book like Stafford’s can only be written by someone...

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Thursday, 13 July 2017 20:00

Finding the Gospel in Game of Thrones

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Unless you’re living under a rock (or the proverbial bushel), it’s impossible to have missed the phenomenon that isGame of Thrones. Part fantasy epic, part prestige television, its controversial subject matter has made it a bit of a touchy subject for Christians. Both straight-laced...

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We live in an age of remarkably high levels of economic disruption brought about by technological developments. That’s a truism, of course, but it’s as good a starting place as any for considering the book we are discussing today. As the internet has become more entrenched, the...

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I’m pleased to publish this guest review by Joshua Novalis.

Every morning, on my way to work, I drive past an apartment complex amusingly named Walden Pond. While I’ve never spoken with the owners, I assume the name to be their attempt to woo prospective tenants with the cozy idea that...

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I’m pleased to publish this book review by Kayla Snow.

Any book written with the expressed intention of moving its readers to stop reading is one that piques my curiosity. When that book is about trees, I am especially intrigued. And, this is what Fiona Stafford, a professor of English at the...

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Tuesday, 27 June 2017 20:00

Book Review: One by One by Gina Dalfonzo

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In One by One, Gina Dalfonzo capably explains the many challenges that singles face in participating in local Christian communities and lays out some ideas on how churches can do better in this important area. (Dalfonzo rightly notes that as more and more young Americans choose to delay...

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Chapter five is, so far, the most contemporary essay in Du Bois’s book. In it, he considers the city of Atlanta and what it says about the future of both African Americans and the South more broadly considered. He begins by noting how appropriate “Atlanta” is as a name...

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Thursday, 22 June 2017 20:00

Book Review: Reclaiming Hope by Michael Wear

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In Reclaiming Hope Michael Wear has written an engaging, clarifying work that nevertheless fails because it does not properly distinguish between a person’s testimony and their political theology. As such, the book often begins well before veering off into needless ambiguity due to a...

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This guest review is written by Ben Whisenant.

Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse has written a book about raising children to be adults, and strangely for a book written by a sitting politician, it contains no concrete policy proposals. It’s a truism, especially on the political right, that...

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Sunday, 18 June 2017 20:00

On Father’s Day, Living in Losses, and Home

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There’s nothing that can prepare you to touch your father’s arm and find that it’s frozen. I should have known, of course. Doctors had told us what they were doing and said he’d be cold. But it’s one thing to know he’ll be cold. It’s another to feel...

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