But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Mere Orthodoxy - Apologetic Report

I’m pleased to publish this contribution to our family worship series from Shane Anderson.

“The voice of rejoicing and salvation is in the tabernacles of the righteous!” (Psalm 118:15)

Our minister, Arie, grew up in a Reformed church tradition where daily family worship is the norm,...

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Thursday, 20 April 2017 03:10

Gangs of New Jerusalem: Act 1

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We’ve been told that this is “unintelligible.” “Self-indulgently self-referential,” they’ve called it. “Possibly a really bad idea.” “Only five people will get it,” they’ve said. Well, you know who else they said that about? Shaw....

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Alastair, Andrew and Matt carried on the Bible study they were having on Genesis 1.

If you like the show, please do leave us a review on iTunes. We are also available on Google Play.

If you’re interested in supporting the show financially, you can check out our Patreon here.

Finally,...

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October 2016 was a simpler, more innocent time. We were all youths, wet behind the ears; we look back at ourselves with a kind of bemused affection. Rod Dreher assumed, surely—we all assumed—that Hillary Clinton would win in November, that all would continue as it had been. This was the...

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Sunday, 16 April 2017 23:00

On Family Worship and Failure

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The latest post in our series comes from Eric Hutchinson.

In “Love Minus Zero/No Limit,” Bob Dylan says that the subject of the song “knows there’s no success like failure/and that failure’s no success at all.” I’d like to apply the first part–that...

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Thursday, 13 April 2017 00:12

Mere Fidelity: On Genesis 1, Part Two

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We enjoyed our last Bible study on Genesis 1 so much that we decided to do it again. Listen in as Alastair, Matt and Andrew discuss the second half of the chapter.

If you like the show, please do leave us a review on iTunes. We are also available on Google Play.

If you’re interested in...

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Wednesday, 12 April 2017 23:00

Family Worship as Spiritual Formation

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The first post in this series comes from my friend Eric Parker.

Morning and evening prayer with kids never goes exactly according to plan. I honestly don’t enjoy it nearly as much as private prayer, but that’s not really the point. It’s for the spiritual formation of the family as...

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Wednesday, 12 April 2017 01:01

On Reinvigorating Family Worship: A Mere O Project

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I’m excited to announce a short series of posts we’ll be running in the coming days on family worship. I have had a growing sense of the need for this sort of series for awhile, due in part to the BenOp discussions, but due more, I think, to the larger questions about Christians in...

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I think it was C. S. Lewis who once said of a new friend, maybe Owen Barfield, that he had read all the right books only to come to all the wrong conclusions. Lewis’s quote came to mind on several occasions as I read Alissa Wilkinson and Robert Joustra’sHow to Survive the Apocalypse.

Th...

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Alastair, Derek and Matt get together for a good ol’ fashioned Bible study on Genesis 1.

If you like the show, please do leave us a review on iTunes. We are also available on Google Play.

If you’re interested in supporting the show financially, you can check out our Patreon here.

Finally,...

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One of my primary points in my review of Rod’s book is that orthodox Christians need a robust commitment to conversation if we are to thrive in a post-Christian context. Given the importance this will play and the related point about how much of this will also be happening online rather than...

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In arecent essay forThe New Republic,religion reporter Sarah Posner contends that the Religious Right has “effectively become a subsidiary of the alt-right, yoked toTrump’s white nationalist agenda.” By effectively wedding themselves to Trump’s narrative about...

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Last Thursday’s “Time for the Benedict Option?” discussion hosted by Plough, First Things, and The American Conservative was a great summary of the Benedict Option debate so far and where things ought to go from here. You can watch the entire thing here:

Noah Millman has a good...

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We’re pleased to publish this review by Dr. Miles Smith.

Recent cultural and social changes in the United States have prompted concerned Christians to pick up their pens and address their respective flocks on the question of how to maintain Christian witness in an increasingly hostile society....

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When I was 12 years old, I took a walk in the woods and I got lost. It wasn’t just me: it was the day after Thanksgiving and there were five of us. My cousin Daniel was the oldest, 13, but it was my parents’ farm, so my brother and I were supposed to know the lay of the land. And until...

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In this latest episode of Mere Fidelity, we take up the question of Lent and individualism with Steven Wedgeworth, pastor of Christ Church Lakeland and writer at The Calvinist International. As with all great Mere Fidelity episodes, this one started with a Twitter discussion for which Keith Miller i...

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We’re pleased to publish this guest post from Brian Mesimer.

Certain family therapy theorists maintain that when you are working with a couple, there are always three people in the room to consider: the man, the woman, and the relationship itself. The more I have begun to work with...

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We’re pleased to publish this guest feature from Patrick Stefan.

Hello. My name is Patrick and I’m going to trust you with a story. I don’t know you, but my hope is that you are reading this piece for the right reasons—to be challenged and to grow. Last week I was challenged...

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Fair Warning: This is long. But I’ve tried to break it up with some header tags that make it easy to scan. To make scanning easier, the review basically falls into three parts: The paragraphs between “Introduction” and “What is Rod’s strategy…” concern the...

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Getting historical perspective on a contemporary topic of debate is always helpful. Dr. Christopher Cleveland’s essay for us on the trinitarian controversy last summer is exceptional precisely because of how successfully he tied the current debate to historical debates and difficulties. Today...

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When asked about the Holy Roman Empire the French philosophe Voltaire once quipped that said empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire. I had something like that thought while reading Dr. James K. A. Smith’s piece for the Washington Post. That said, Dr. Smith’s post is far...

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I suspect the highest complement you can give a book written by a professor is that, upon finishing the book, you find yourself wishing that you could take a class with him. As I finished Anthony Esolen’s Out of the Ashes my immediate response was precisely that—I wish there...

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Tuesday, 07 March 2017 22:00

On Gratitude and the Fifth Commandment

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We are pleased to publish this guest feature from Dr. Eric Hutchinson of Hillsdale College.

In my first two posts, we’ve seen what the classical two-kingdoms distinction was for the sixteenth century Reformers, whether “Lutheran” or “Reformed,” and also the way in which...

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Sunday, 05 March 2017 22:00

Our Middlebury Moment

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Last week, professor Charles Murray, a right-leaning social scientist, was invited onto the campus of Middlebury College in Vermont. As has been frequently the case at many universities over the last few years, student-led protests erupted in disapproval of Murray’s presence at the school....

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If you’ll indulge me, I’m going to circle back around to Emma Green’s review of Rod’s book while also linking it to Katelyn Beaty’s review of the same published earlier this week in the Washington Post. The point that both Green and Beaty camp out on for a...

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