But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Mere Orthodoxy - Apologetic Report

by Daniel DeCarlo

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari’s re-election victory in February of this year was in many ways a surprise. His first term’s report card included a failing economy, rising violence, higher unemployment, and almost no progress in tackling corruption and lawlessness....

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By Barton Gingerich

June has been dubbed “Pride Month,” a new holy festival in our cultural calendar. Just in time for the season, logos of powerful, influential corporations have changed their logos to rainbow hues. Pop idol Taylor Swift dropped a new song and video castigating...

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As a teenager at my parents’ small-town church, I heard men in business suits express relief that they made it out of the farm where they grew up. “I got out,” they would say. The implication: I moved up.

I don’t begrudge them that they found farming not to their liking. I...

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Monday, 08 July 2019 20:00

Against Pop Culture

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By Brad East

Christians love pop culture these days. But the subset of Christians who love pop culture the most is pastors, writers, and academics. Pop culture as a mode of “engagement”; pop culture as a means of “reaching” this or that group; pop culture as a way of...

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By S. Dorman

Hunting is either a discipline or a confused slaughter. Walking home this morning I thought first, not of hunting, but of my usual route along the road. I was also thinking about writing a paper on Johannes Kepler and emerging science. Then I saw the path leading out of my way, a path I...

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By Sean O’Hare

Mere weeks have passed since the burning of the cathedral in Paris. All of us, each for their own reasons, were gripped by the flames that engulfed Notre Dame. Few recent events seem to have been saturated with as much aching symbolism as that day was, and from it came an...

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You didn’t have to be a close follower of contemporary political theory to know that Yoram Hazony’s The Virtue of Nationalismwas going to be the equivalent of shooting a paintball into a hornet’s nest. Here was a book with something to make nearly everyone mad—or nearly...

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Human moral growth is partially measured by a human being’s desire to live in the truth. This involves accepting the truth about ourselves – or put negatively – refusing to avoid unsavory realities about our own lives. The same could be said of human communities who seek to live...

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Sunday, 30 June 2019 20:00

The World We Have and the World We Want

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By Zachary Holbrook

The pace of online discourse makes life difficult for those who wish to think seriously about Christianity and politics. By now, the takes have begun to cool regarding the recent fracas between Sohrab Ahmari, David French, and their respective factions within the conservative...

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Thursday, 27 June 2019 20:00

Post-Liberalism and American Racism

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Recently Adam Serwer published a piece in The Atlantic characterizing the current conversation about liberalism amongst American conservatives as essentially being a sustained, intellectualized temper tantrum thrown over their loss of power. Ross Douthat has done the main work in critiquing...

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In a post over at National Review, NR editor Charles C. W. Cooke has joined the chorus of critics castigating Sohrab Ahmari for giving up on liberalism.

Here is the meat of his critique, though you ought to read the whole thing as, whatever else it is doing, Cooke is helpfully articulating a...

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Wednesday, 26 June 2019 17:00

“Dignity,” with Chris Arnade

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Chris Arnade joins Andrew, Derek, and Alastair to talk about his new book, “Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America,” where he tells the stories of how America’s poor find dignity and identity in their forgotten communities.

Timestamps:

Intro + the story behind the book,...

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By Susannah Black, Christian Young, and Jake Meador

Looking for some creative summer weekend plans and keep coming back to the possibility of military intervention in Iran? Before you pencil that in, consider these less-expensive alternatives that are just as much fun!

  1. Buy a sailboat, fully outfit it...

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By Hannah Anderson

In the recently released memoir, My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home, Michael Brenden Dougherty, senior editor at National Review,traces his personal history as the son of an absent Irish father. His journey to make sense of his roots began in...

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Monday, 17 June 2019 20:00

Book Review: Dignity by Chris Arnade

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One of the most important explorations of political theology in recent years is Andrew Willard Jones’s book Before Church and State.

Jones’s argument is that our modern social norms, including our political system, are built on the idea that conflict is the natural state of man. Because...

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Matt gave three lectures recently at Biola University on the topic of justice. The recordings are now online and are definitely worth your time:

Authors: Jake Meador...

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Wednesday, 12 June 2019 23:58

Political Theology in an Age of Discontent

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By Jonathan Cole (This piece is the introduction to his new book Christian Political Theology in an Age of Discontent)

Anarchist political philosopher Pierre-Joseph Proudhon memorably defined theology as “the science of the infinitely absurd.”[1] Proudhon, who made this remark in...

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By Justin Hawkins

(Presented for Delivery at the 2019 Henry Institute Symposium on Christianity and Politics, Calvin College, April 26, 2019)

Introduction

I begin with an intentionally polemical anecdote. On December 7, 2015 – a day that will live in infamy – the presidential campaign of...

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Monday, 10 June 2019 20:00

Are America’s Megachurches Too Big to Fail?

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2008 introduced us to the idea of something being “too big to fail.” In that case it was our nation’s largest banks. They had grown so large and played such a decisive role in our nation’s economy that our national government decided that it could not let the banks fail,...

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Monday, 10 June 2019 03:48

Can Social Conservatives Lead?

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Rusty Reno is right in saying that social conservatives should take the lead in American conservatism. The reason why is plain.

Unlike the libertarians, we have a substantive account of the good to which we think society should tend. Unlike the alt-right, our account of common life is not itself a...

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Thursday, 06 June 2019 20:00

Five Theses on Preaching

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By Brad East

(originally posted on Resident Theologian)

1. The principal subject matter for preaching, always and everywhere, is the triune God of Israel attested and revealed in the good news about Jesus, the Lord and Messiah of Israel. If a sermon could not plausibly be said to have been about ...

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Wednesday, 05 June 2019 20:00

Against An Economy Financed by Human Bodies

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By Andreas Vesalius

During my teenage years, I experienced periods of intense disdain for my physicality. In becoming fully aware of my sexuality and my existence as a sexual being, I came to oppose such an existence. I envied the sexual unawareness of my prepubescent self. I began to believe my...

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In their indispensable book Reclaiming the Body, Joel Shuman and Brian Volck recall a course on literature and medicine taught to 4th-year medical students. Students were asked to describe how they hoped to die with essays, and the results were as follows:

Almost without exception, their essays were...

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By Matthew Emerson

Walter R. Strickland II. “Liberation and Black Theological Method: A Historical Analysis.” Ph.D. Diss: University of Aberdeen, 2017.

Summary

Despite common historical pressures that gave rise to its distinctive tasks and goals, Black Theology is not a monolithic...

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Monday, 03 June 2019 17:00

The “Boring” Parts of Scripture

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Matt, Derek, and Alastair mull over the “boring” parts of scripture to see how these monotonous passages can be more greatly appreciated and share advice and resources that everyday Bible-readers can use. Matt also shares why Derek and Alastair are wrong for suggesting any book but John...

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