But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Apologetic Report - Mere Orthodoxy

When I was 12 years old, I took a walk in the woods and I got lost. It wasn’t just me: it was the day after Thanksgiving and there were five of us. My cousin Daniel was the oldest, 13, but it was my parents’ farm, so my brother and I were supposed to know the lay of the land. And until...

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In this latest episode of Mere Fidelity, we take up the question of Lent and individualism with Steven Wedgeworth, pastor of Christ Church Lakeland and writer at The Calvinist International. As with all great Mere Fidelity episodes, this one started with a Twitter discussion for which Keith Miller i...

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We’re pleased to publish this guest post from Brian Mesimer.

Certain family therapy theorists maintain that when you are working with a couple, there are always three people in the room to consider: the man, the woman, and the relationship itself. The more I have begun to work with...

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We’re pleased to publish this guest feature from Patrick Stefan.

Hello. My name is Patrick and I’m going to trust you with a story. I don’t know you, but my hope is that you are reading this piece for the right reasons—to be challenged and to grow. Last week I was challenged...

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Fair Warning: This is long. But I’ve tried to break it up with some header tags that make it easy to scan. To make scanning easier, the review basically falls into three parts: The paragraphs between “Introduction” and “What is Rod’s strategy…” concern the...

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Getting historical perspective on a contemporary topic of debate is always helpful. Dr. Christopher Cleveland’s essay for us on the trinitarian controversy last summer is exceptional precisely because of how successfully he tied the current debate to historical debates and difficulties. Today...

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When asked about the Holy Roman Empire the French philosophe Voltaire once quipped that said empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire. I had something like that thought while reading Dr. James K. A. Smith’s piece for the Washington Post. That said, Dr. Smith’s post is far...

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I suspect the highest complement you can give a book written by a professor is that, upon finishing the book, you find yourself wishing that you could take a class with him. As I finished Anthony Esolen’s Out of the Ashes my immediate response was precisely that—I wish there...

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Tuesday, 07 March 2017 22:00

On Gratitude and the Fifth Commandment

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We are pleased to publish this guest feature from Dr. Eric Hutchinson of Hillsdale College.

In my first two posts, we’ve seen what the classical two-kingdoms distinction was for the sixteenth century Reformers, whether “Lutheran” or “Reformed,” and also the way in which...

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Sunday, 05 March 2017 22:00

Our Middlebury Moment

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Last week, professor Charles Murray, a right-leaning social scientist, was invited onto the campus of Middlebury College in Vermont. As has been frequently the case at many universities over the last few years, student-led protests erupted in disapproval of Murray’s presence at the school....

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If you’ll indulge me, I’m going to circle back around to Emma Green’s review of Rod’s book while also linking it to Katelyn Beaty’s review of the same published earlier this week in the Washington Post. The point that both Green and Beaty camp out on for a...

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We’re pleased to publish this guest feature by Matt Mellema and Ian Speir.

President Trump’s tapping of Judge Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court has won near-universal praise from the Religious Right. Gorsuch has been lauded as anarticulate originalist, acommitted textualist, and a...

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Wednesday, 22 February 2017 22:00

The Benedict Option and Its Reviewers

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Rod’s forthcoming book, The Benedict Option, is beginning to attract some considerable press attention. The Wall Street Journal has recently featured the book as part of a profile of the Clear Creek Catholics in rural Oklahoma. (I visited them last summer to attend a conference they held...

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Tuesday, 21 February 2017 22:00

Progressives, Harry Potter, and Little Platoons

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We’re pleased to publish this guest feature by Bart Gingerich.

Why do progressives like Harry Potter? Ever since the election of Donald Trump, the left has beenregularly referencing to JK Rowling’s popular books in order to rally the opposition to the new president. When you read the...

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We are thrilled to have Yuval Levin join us to discuss his important book The Fractured Republic: Renewing America’s Social Contract in an Age of Individualism.Levin is widely regarded as one of the brightest conservative thinkers working today. He helped found both National...

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We are pleased to publish this guest feature by Bryan Baise.

On Monday, the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) rescinded their invitation to Milo Yiannopoulos after a video recording emergedwhich many interpreted to be a defense of pedophilia. Milo has since clarified his comments...

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Wednesday, 15 February 2017 07:02

Mere Fidelity: Reviving the Worship Wars

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In this episode of Mere Fidelity, we decide it’s time to revive the worship wars.

If you like the show, please do leave us a review on iTunes. We are also available on Google Play.

If you’re interested in supporting the show financially, you can check out our Patreon here.

Finally,...

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In one of his books Christopher Hitchens advised his readers to always attend to the language used by the people they are studying or covering. The way the person uses language will often tell you things far more important than whatever the person is actually saying, Hitchens said.

I’ve...

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In 2017, many Protestants will observe the 500th anniversary of their revolution—or at least of its most celebrated image: the promulgation of Luther’sNinety-five Theses. Though inevitably drowned out by triumphalism, some such observances will be understandably ambivalent about the...

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Thursday, 09 February 2017 06:00

Evangelicals and the Loss of Prophetic Imagination

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I’m pleased to publish this guest post by Sharon Hodde Miller.

This year has changed me. I say this in all earnestness and with no dramatic intent, but this year really has changed me. I am not the same person I was, and my calling has shifted too.

It’s difficult to pinpoint when the...

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Donald Trump was sworn in as President at noon on Friday, January 20th. Within an hour, all references to climate change had been removed from the White House website. He has stacked key positions with outspoken climate change deniers, and a couple days ago, one Republican Congressman went so far...

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This guest post is written by Dr. Eric Hutchinson, professor of Classics at Hillsdale College.

First, by way of introduction: a delightful scene from Whit Stillman’s recent movieLove and Friendship, in which Sir James Martin attempts to have an erudite conversation with Frederica, Lady...

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Tuesday, 07 February 2017 06:48

Mere Fidelity: Silence, with Brett McCracken

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In this episode, we discuss Martin Scorsese’s new film Silence, which is an adaptation of Shūsaku Endo’s book of the same name. Film critic Brett McCracken makes his Mere Fidelity debut; he reviewed the film here, and can be followed on Twitter here. Alastair offers...

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Monday, 06 February 2017 09:08

The Sexual Revolution Is Abortion

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A few years ago I read an online exchange between two self-described Christians that has lingered with me as a good summary of our cultural moment. One of the speakers identified as bisexual, but also as a Christian, and was arguing with more traditional Christians about sexual ethics. During...

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President Donald Trump made good on one of his most prominent campaign promises by nominating Judge Neil Gorsuch to succeed Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. In response, many of my lawyer friends tweeted at me with gifs of people dancing in celebration. This was the...

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