But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Apologetic Report - RBAP News

The Acts of the Risen Lord Jesus: Luke’s account of God’s unfolding plan,

Alan J. Thompson

(Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2011, 232 pages),

reviewed by Richard C. Barcellos

The Acts of the Risen Lord Jesus is the most recent installment in the New Studies in Biblical...

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Friday, 10 February 2017 10:20

what Fred Sanders thinks of Confessing the Impassible God

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A spirited reclaiming of the doctrine of divine impassibility, this coherent, well-edited, multi-author project is unique in several commendable aspects. It is decisively Baptist, but advances its argument in ways that recent generations have stopped expecting from Baptist theologians. These...

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Monday, 23 January 2017 13:43

Matthew Poole’s commentary on Colossians 1:20

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Matthew Poole died after finishing his commentary on Isaiah but others, utilizing and relying heavily upon his Synopsis Criticorum, completed Jeremiah through Revelation. Poole’s Synopsis, as described in a footnote to the Banner of...

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Thursday, 19 January 2017 21:44

John Davenant (1572-1641) on Colossians 1:20

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 John Davenant (1572-1641) on Colossians 1:20

 Davenant was an Anglican minister, bishop of Salisbury. His commentary on Colossians was first published in Latin in 1627 then translated into English in 1831. In his introductory comments on Colossians 1:20, he makes this observation:

 But...

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Wednesday, 18 January 2017 23:08

John Calvin on Colossians 1:20

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 John Calvin (1509-1564) on Colossians 1:20

 In Calvin’s commentary on Colossians 1:20, while explaining the words “both upon earth and in heaven,” he says:

 . . . I prefer to understand this as referring to angels and men ; and as to the latter, there is no...

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Wednesday, 18 January 2017 08:56

John Daille on Colossians 1:20

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 John Daille (1594-1670) on Colossians 1:20

 John Daille was a French Huguenot minister and commentator. His sermons on Colossians were first published in 1648. In his discussion on Colossians 1:20, seeking to explain its connection with verse 19, Daille says:

This [i.e., v. 20] is...

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#1 The Holy Spirit is the Only Infallible Interpreter of Holy Scripture.

#2 The Analogy of the Scriptures (Analogia Scripturae)

#3 The Analogy of Faith(Analogia Fidei)

Muller defines analogia fidei as follows:

the use of a general sense of the meaning of Scripture,...

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#1 The Holy Spirit is the Only Infallible Interpreter of Holy Scripture.

#2 The Analogy of the Scriptures (Analogia Scripturae)

Here is Richard A. Muller’s definition of analogia Scripturae: “the interpretation of unclear, difficult, or ambiguous passages of Scripture by...

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The Holy Spirit is the Only Infallible Interpreter of Holy Scripture.

 

As an example of this principle, John Owen says, “The only unique, public, authentic, and infallible interpreter of Scripture is none other than the Author of Scripture Himself . . . that is, God the Holy...

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This is taken from the Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies 2016.

 

There have been changes in translations and different interpretations offered on Ephesians 4:12 in the last 100 years or so differing from the position held prior to the twentieth century. We will not seek...

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RBAP is offering the hardback facsimile edition of the 1677 Second London Confession of Faith for $15.00 plus s/h, suggested retail $20.00. This edition includes a preface by Dr. Mike Renihan, “To the Judicious and Impartial Reader,” table of contents, the text of the Confession,...

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Product title

Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies, 2016

James M. Renihan, Editor 

Product description

The Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies (JIRBS) is published to explain and support the theology of Holy Scripture as it is summarized in...

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Tuesday, 22 November 2016 11:03

Recovering our Confessional Heritage

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The first three books in the series Recovering our Confessional Heritage will be available at the RBAP site very soon.

imageAuthors: RBAP...

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Friday, 18 November 2016 15:28

the Christological view of Heb. 4:9-10 and hymnody

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Just as God entered his rest on the seventh day at creation, thus becoming the Sabbath day by positive example (and a pledge of glory to come), so Christ entered his rest on the first day, the day he rose from the dead, the day his new-creative/redemptive work was accomplished, thus becoming...

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conclusion to “UNITY AND DISTINCTION—One God in Three Persons: Unity of Essence, Distinction of Persons, Implications for Life,” A Review Article by Stefan T. Lindblad, coming soon in Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies 2016

If mystery is the lifeblood of...

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Thursday, 03 November 2016 15:18

Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies 2016

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THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH: Its Reasons, Duration and Goal, and Practical Effects (Ephesians 4:11-16), with Special Emphasis on verse 12

Richard C. Barcellos

BRING THEM TO THE WORD, NOT THE WATER: Pastoral Instructions for Fathers in the First and Second Century Church

Ryan...

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Endorsement for A Defense of Confessionalism, Arden L. Hodgins, Jr. #1 in the series Recovering our Confessional Heritage, coming soon from IRBS/RBAP

 
The present age is one where many Christians are impatient with the idea of creeds and confessions of faith. Yet the pressures of our...

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5.

Conclusion

 

 

Moses, writing after the historical acts of creation, utilizes the covenantal name of God, Yahweh, while discussing Adam’s Edenic vocation (Gen. 2:4ff.). Isaiah utilizes concepts that started with Adam to explain the universal guilt of man, while using the...

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To take exception to the Confession’s doctrine of the Christian Sabbath is no minor thing. It ends up tinkering with the theological symmetry of the whole. Denying the formulation of 22.7 necessarily affects other doctrinal formulations within the Confession. Philip S. Ross, while...

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Here is the table of contents for Getting the Garden Wrong: A Critique of New Covenant Theology on the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath, Richard C. Barcellos, coming soon from Founders Press.

Table of Contents
Preface

  1. Introduction
  2. What is New Covenant Theology?
  3. The...

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The 1677 facsimile edition of our Confession cites two texts that are of interest to our study. Here is the text as it occurred in 1677: “By the decree of God for the manifestation of his glory (g) some men and Angels, are predestinated, or fore-ordained to Eternal Life, through Jesus...

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Assuming the exposition above, several implications follow. First, there is a present Sabbath rest, a Sabbath-keeping, for the people of God under the inaugurated new covenant. This is what the Old Testament prophesied and what the Gospel accounts lead us to expect.

Second, the present Sabbath...

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