But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

Zondervan Academic Koinonia Blog - Apologetic Report

imageIn order to understand the nature of the Reformers’ disagreement with Rome, you have to understand the nature of two intertwining ideas that anchor Catholic sacramental theology: the “nature-grace interdependence” and the “Christ-Church interconnection.”

Stephen Wellum...

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I have been thinking a lot about some of the general issues of translation, and one of the points that keeps coming up is the issue of metaphors. I would like your opinion.

Are metaphors inspired?

I am asking if the inspired authors chose to use a metaphor to convey meaning, are we required to use a...

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You know you have been talking too much about translation when your spouse throws your own words back in your face. Robin was reading Ps 102:12 the other day. “But you, Lord, sit enthroned forever; your renown endures through all generations” (NIV).

“Renown,” she laughed,...

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imageIn today’s excerpt from Grace Alone–Salvation as a Gift of God, Carl Trueman, professor of Historical Theology and Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary, gives us the background and context of Thomas Aquinas, the unexpected friend of grace alone.

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 If...

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This month’s post concludes a post begun June 2017; please see that post for an explanation of versification. As mentioned there, this post will follow Hebrew numbering with Hebrew texts and English numbering with English texts.

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Articles “A” and “The” in v. 23b–d

He...

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Jesus wanted his disciples to understand that there were some who would seek to distort the gospel. He called them “false prophets,” and he told the disciples how they’d be able to differentiate them from the real thing:

“Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in...

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I have been enjoying reading the CSB, the new version of the former HCSB. Tom Schreiner and his group of translators have done an excellent job at updating an already good translation.

I was reading in Matt 5 this morning and came across v 22. “Everyone who is angry with his brother or sister...

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Due to the influence of law-heavy teaching, the Galatians struggled to understand how to mature as Christians. Did they become righteous by following a set of moral precepts as their forefathers believed, or was there more to it than that?

Throughout the book of Galatians, Paul teaches the Galatians...

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Friday, 28 July 2017 21:58

What Is the False Gospel in Galatians?

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It doesn’t take too long for Paul to get to the heart of the issue in his letter to the Galatians. He’s concerned that they’re abandoning Jesus’ grace and turning to a different gospel—a false gospel.

Paul doesn’t mince words when it comes to Judaizers coming in...

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Thursday, 27 July 2017 21:37

Who Were the Galatians?

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If someone was to ask you who Paul wrote his epistle to the Galatians to, how would you respond? If you’re like most people, you’d probably answer that it was written to the church at Galatia, and—technically—you’d be right.

But did you know that there’s actually...

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Thursday, 27 July 2017 06:19

The Role of the Old Testament Law in Galatians

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Communicating the role that the law played in God’s overall plan of salvation was one of the New Testament church’s biggest challenges. As Jews accepted that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah, they struggled to understand how to bring their Jewish roots into this new reality.

The...

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Grand Rapids, Mich., July 27, 2017— Zondervan Academic is pleased to announce that many of its titles are now available for libraries through EBSCO’s GOBI® Library Solutions and EBSCOhost Collection Manager.

“For many years, academic librarians have requested the availability...

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image “Grace is a profoundly existential matter” (157).

That’s the verdict in Carl Trueman’s new book Grace Alone, a tour de force through the biblical, historical, and existential conversations surrounding salvation as a gift of God. How is grace existential?

[Grace] does not...

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Common Places has been a regular column on the Zondervan Academic blog with a focus on systematic theology. The loci communes or “common places” of Christian theology, drawn out of the Scriptures and organized in a manner suitable to their exposition in the church and the academy, have...

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Monday, 17 July 2017 22:00

How You Can Translate Mark 1–4 On Your Own

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image A few weeks ago we introduced you to an approach to reading biblical Greek that Mark Strauss calls “interesting and innovative.”

Reading Biblical Greek, ideated and designed by Richard J. Gibson and Constantine R. Campbell, introduces first-year Greek students to the essential...

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Right now a handful of eBooks are on sale for Amazon Kindle. Save up to 68% on the titles below, but don’t wait: The deals end July 31, 2017.

Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth. Sale: $3.99. Original: $12.99

Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart, How to Read...

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I came across a really strange use of ἀντί the other day. It serves as a good example of semantic range.

Speaking of Jesus, Heb 12:2 says, “For (ἀντί) the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the...

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imageIn Katie Luther, Ruth Tucker introduces us to Katharina von Bora, wife of Martin Luther and First Lady of the Reformation.

This is not the sweet and submissive, subdued and godly woman many assume the great Reformer married. Instead, we discover a strong, independent woman whose voice echoes among...

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Sometimes Greek can really be frustrating, especially when it is succinct. Here is a good example: John 3:21 reads, “But the one who does the truth comes to the light, so that his deeds may be clearly seen (φανερωθῇ...

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“How do we make a five-hundred-year-old Katharina relevant to North American culture? Is there anything she has to say to Western women and men today? Why should we take the time to make her acquaintance?” (9)

In today’s excerpt from Kathie Luther, First Lady of the Reformation,...

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Thursday, 06 July 2017 21:31

How to study the book of Romans

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Romans is one of the most well-known books of the Bible.

You’ve probably heard a hundred sermons from the book of Romans. You might list Romans 8 as one of your favorite passages. You might be aware that Romans contains some of the key passages on predestination, the doctrine of justification,...

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This month’s post continues from last month. Please see the June 2017 post for an explanation of versification. As mentioned there, this post will follow Hebrew numbering with Hebrew texts and English numbering with English texts.

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Adjectives

The Hebrew of 22b–d contains three adjectives,...

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Thursday, 06 July 2017 01:27

What the Bible says about predestination

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In any conversation about predestination, election, and God’s will in the act of salvation, two verses from Romans 8 are usually cited:

For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers and sisters. And those...

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Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of theforthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

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  1. Your treatment of sanctification is itself a whole dogmatics in miniature. What led you to take this approach?

Two things have been formative here.

First,...

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imageThe English idiom “It’s all Greek to me” isn’t merely an expression that something isn’t understandable. It also embodies the frustrations all first-year Greek students have when they encounter the foreign language of the New Testament, yet want to understand it in...

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