But even if you should suffer for the sake of righteousness, you are blessed. And do not fear their intimidation, and do not be troubled, but sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you yet with gentleness and reverence; and keep a good conscience so that in the thing in which you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ will be put to shame.  1 Peter 3: 14-16

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Aimee Byrd, Recovering from Biblical Manhood and Womanhood: How the Church Needs to Rediscover Her Purpose (Zondervan, 2020).

Aimee Byrd has written a book with a specific focus: as a member in a confessional Reformed denomination (OPC), she asks her readers “to look at the yellow wallpaper in...

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Friday, 06 March 2020 00:31

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (5)

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In today’s selection, Melanchthon affirms both that the church has never ceased to exist, from its establishment in the time of Genesis all the way up to the present, and that it nevertheless has often been quite small. This he proves from, for example, the case of Noah. Still, God does not...

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Friday, 06 March 2020 00:31

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (5)

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In today’s selection, Melanchthon affirms both that the church has never ceased to exist, from its establishment in the time of Genesis all the way up to the present, and that it nevertheless has often been quite small. This he proves from, for example, the case of Noah. Still, God does not...

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Thursday, 05 March 2020 03:53

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (4)

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In today’s post, Melanchthon cites one more patristic source (Origen) as an example of how the church’s authority is rightly deployed. 

He then proceeds to sketch his understanding of the relation of the church to the Word and to give his definitions of what the church (1) is not,...

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Thursday, 05 March 2020 03:53

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (4)

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In today’s post, Melanchthon cites one more patristic source (Origen) as an example of how the church’s authority is rightly deployed. 

He then proceeds to sketch his understanding of the relation of the church to the Word and to give his definitions of what the church (1) is not,...

Read more

Wednesday, 04 March 2020 01:46

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (3)

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In today’s post, Melanchthon begins to marshal patristic support for his understanding of the relative weight of various authorities in theology. Melanchthon’s high view of both Scripture and patristic antiquity are clear in what follows from his use of Tertullian, Irenaeus, and...

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Wednesday, 04 March 2020 01:46

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (3)

Written by

In today’s post, Melanchthon begins to marshal patristic support for his understanding of the relative weight of various authorities in theology. Melanchthon’s high view of both Scripture and patristic antiquity are clear in what follows from his use of Tertullian, Irenaeus, and...

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Tuesday, 03 March 2020 01:11

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (2)

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This is just a short one for today. In this passage, Melanchthon sketches how one ought to affirm the supreme authority of Scripture without going overboard. His concern for antiquity echoes Zanchi’swonderful statement that “I, certainly, do not depart from antiquity unless I have been...

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Tuesday, 03 March 2020 01:11

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (2)

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This is just a short one for today. In this passage, Melanchthon sketches how one ought to affirm the supreme authority of Scripture without going overboard. His concern for antiquity echoes Zanchi’swonderful statement that “I, certainly, do not depart from antiquity unless I have been...

Read more

Monday, 02 March 2020 02:38

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (1)

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A new week; time for a new series. This one, which will last for a while, will be on Melanchthon’s treatiseDe ecclesia et autoritate verbi dei (“On the Church and the Authority of the Word of God”), first published in 1539. My translation, which will be the first into English (I...

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Monday, 02 March 2020 02:38

Melanchthon on the Church and the Word (1)

Written by

A new week; time for a new series. This one, which will last for a while, will be on Melanchthon’s treatiseDe ecclesia et autoritate verbi dei (“On the Church and the Authority of the Word of God”), first published in 1539. My translation, which will be the first into English (I...

Read more

I missed last week (sorry!) but here is the Collect for this week (Invocavit Sunday) from the Order of Worship for the Reformed Church in the United States, to accompany the Gospel reading from Matthew 6.1-11 and 2 Corinthians 6.1-10.

Invocavit Sunday

THE COLLECT

WE beseech Thee, O Lord, by the...

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I missed last week (sorry!) but here is the Collect for this week (Invocavit Sunday) from the Order of Worship for the Reformed Church in the United States, to accompany the Gospel reading from Matthew 6.1-11 and 2 Corinthians 6.1-10.

Invocavit Sunday

THE COLLECT

WE beseech Thee, O Lord, by the...

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This post wraps up the series on Hemmingsen on the Sabbath and Christian festivals. In these fourassertiones, he concludes with some remarks on change, continuity, and authority. 

Of special significance is the hard distinction he makes between “worship” (cultus) and...

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This post wraps up the series on Hemmingsen on the Sabbath and Christian festivals. In these fourassertiones, he concludes with some remarks on change, continuity, and authority. 

Of special significance is the hard distinction he makes between “worship” (cultus) and...

Read more

In today’s theses, Hemmingsen discusses the very important topic ofadiaphora, or things indifferent, for that is what undergirds his comments on “ceremonies.”

What Zanchi does in the case of festivals, Hemmingsen does in the case of ceremonies, distinguishing between two types,...

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In today’s theses, Hemmingsen discusses the very important topic ofadiaphora, or things indifferent, for that is what undergirds his comments on “ceremonies.”

What Zanchi does in the case of festivals, Hemmingsen does in the case of ceremonies, distinguishing between two types,...

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In today’s post, consisting ofassertiones 27 and 28, Hemmingsen distinguishes his view of Christian festivals from what he considers both gentile and Romanist perversions. Here, one can clearly see how he separates his advocacy for the edifying effect of the “memorials of the...

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In today’s post, consisting ofassertiones 27 and 28, Hemmingsen distinguishes his view of Christian festivals from what he considers both gentile and Romanist perversions. Here, one can clearly see how he separates his advocacy for the edifying effect of the “memorials of the...

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Herewith the next threeassertiones, on the major festivals of redemption and the memorials of saints. One notices the pedagogical and practical purposes 1 Hemmingsen sees for such observances, and the way in which he distinguishes these purposes from the abuse of festivals remarked upon inassertio...

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Herewith the next threeassertiones, on the major festivals of redemption and the memorials of saints. One notices the pedagogical and practical purposes 1 Hemmingsen sees for such observances, and the way in which he distinguishes these purposes from the abuse of festivals remarked upon inassertio...

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Three more theses for today; these are short. In fact, the first isn’t really even a thesis orassertio. Hemmingsen just kind of slips it in there as a point of transition.

In these comments, Hemmingsen starts to turn to what the Sabbath and Christian festivals are now, while the church,...

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Here are Hemmingsen’s next threeassertiones. Hemmingsen unfortunately lumps all Jews together in claiming that they completely misunderstood the Sabbath, which is obviously false. Inassertio 20, it becomes clear what his actual target is: the Pharisees as described in the gospels, who...

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Today we get theses 16 and 17 as Hemmingsen continues to unpack the symbolic significance of the Sabbath according to “threefold time.” Thesis 16 refers to time past and consists mostly of a quotation of Augustine’s twentiethTractate on the Gospel of John, where Augustine argues...

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Today’s post includes theses 14 and 15, on the symbolic significance of the Old Testament Sabbath as it relates to the first two parts of Hemmingsen’s “threefold time,” the past and the present. Thesis 15 shows broad overlap and continuity with what is usually referred to as...

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